How to use


On this site you will find pictures and information about some of the electrical , electrotechnical and mechanical technology relics that the Frank Sharp Private museum has accumulated over the years .
There are lots of vintage electrical and electronic items that have not survived well or even completely disappeared and forgotten.

Or are not being collected nowadays in proportion to their significance or prevalence in their heyday, this is bad and the main part of the death land. The heavy, ugly sarcophagus; models with few endearing qualities, devices that have some over-riding disadvantage to ownership such as heavy weight,toxicity or inflated value when dismantled, tend to be under-represented by all but the most comprehensive collections and museums. They get relegated to the bottom of the wants list, derided as 'more trouble than they are worth', or just forgotten entirely. As a result, I started to notice gaps in the current representation of the history of electronic and electrical technology to the interested member of the public.


Following this idea around a bit, convinced me that a collection of the peculiar alone could not hope to survive on its own merits, but a museum that gave equal display space to the popular and the unpopular, would bring things to the attention of the average person that he has previously passed by or been shielded from. It's a matter of culture. From this, the
Under The Ice Web Museum concept developed and all my other things too. It's an open platform for all electrical Electronic TV technology to have its few, but NOT last, moments of fame in a working, hand-on environment. We'll never own Colossus or Faraday's first transformer, but I can show things that you can't see at the Science Museum, and let you play with things that the Smithsonian can't allow people to touch, because my remit is different.

There was a society once that was the polar opposite of our disposable, junk society. A whole nation was built on the idea of placing quality before quantity in all things. The goal was not “more and newer,” but “better and higher" .This attitude was reflected not only in the manufacturing of material goods, but also in the realms of art and architecture, as well as in the social fabric of everyday life. The goal was for each new cohort of children to stand on a higher level than the preceding cohort: they were to be healthier, stronger, more intelligent, and more vibrant in every way.

The society that prioritized human, social and material quality is a Winner. Truly, it is the high point of all Western civilization. Consequently, its defeat meant the defeat of civilization itself.
Today, the West is headed for the abyss. For the ultimate fate of our disposable society is for that society itself to be disposed of. And this will happen sooner, rather than later.
OLD, but ORIGINAL, Well made, Funny, Not remotely controlled............. and not Made in CHINA.


How to use the FREON12MUSEUM site:

- If you landed here via any Search Engine, you will get what you searched for and you can search more using the search this blog feature provided by Google. You can visit more posts scrolling the right blog archive of all posts of the month/year,
or you can click on the main photo-page to start from the main page. If doing so it starts from the most recent post to the older post simple clicking on the Older Post button on the bottom of each page after reading , post after post.

You can even visit all posts, time to time, reaching the bottom end of each page then click on the Older Post button.


- If you arrived here at the main page via bookmark you can visit all the site scrolling the right blog archive of all posts of the month/year pointing were you want , or more simple You can even visit all blog posts, from newer to older, with clicking at the end of each bottom page on the Older Post button.
So you can see all the blog/site content surfing all pages in it.


- The search this blog feature provided by Google is a real search engine. If you're pointing particular things it will search IT for you; or you can place a brand name in the search query at your choice and visit all results page by page. It's useful since the content of the site is very large.

Note that if you don't find what you searched for, try it after a period of time; the site is a never ending job !

" In the world of 2000's , if we need a cold drink we might go to the refrigerator for a few ice cubes or if there is a fancy model of refrigerator available, then we might have ice water right on tap! Things weren’t always like this however, that is before modern refrigeration.

THE COOLING HISTORY
Chilling has been known for centuries as a preservative for
perishable foods. A preservative, which was only accessible in places, where people could obtain ice during the winter. In practice, ice from lakes and rivers were cut in blocks and stored in heavily insulated rooms or pits from which it was retrieved when needed for cooling.
By use of the mechanical refrigeration, cold production became easier, because the ice could now be manufactured artificially. Now ice factories popped up, where blocks of ice were produced in large-scale operations and delivered to dairies, from which the consumer could fetch ice. The ice was placed in an ice box at home in the kitchen in which it melted and cooled the contents. The principle sounds old-fashioned, but the method was actually used up until the mid-1900s.
Gradually it became possible to produce the refrigerator systems so relatively small that they could be moved to where the cold was to be used. This meant, for example, that a refrigerator system could be placed in the basement and from there the refrigerant was circulated to insulated cabinets placed in the apartments.
Danfoss supplied expansion valves to control the temperature in these refrigeration systems. The expansion valve was Danfoss’ first, largest, and most important product.

In the world of 1810 in Cuba, the ice for our iced drink would need to be imported from the New England states at more than 500 dollars per the ton – that’s a lot of 1810 money! Obviously ice is a very important thing if Boston, at the same time, exported approximately 65,000 tons of ice per year; this is before mechanical refrigeration. Ice traditionally has been very important not only in good drinks, but it has also been critical to hospitals. It is then appropriate that a doctor, Scottish Dr. John Gorrie, received the first patent for mechanical refrigeration in 1842 to help his feverish patients.

After the advent of mechanical refrigeration, the need for ice shipped from temperate climates began to drop10. By 1855 the man made ice was being used in breweries and meat plants, but the new ice machines weren’t without problems. First, the refrigerant of choice for the 19th century ice machine is ammonia, which has the drawbacks of being highly toxic, corrosive, and difficult to compress.

The net result is that the ice machines were massive (as big as a typical kitchen), steam powered (the best source of energy in the 19th century for large equipment – needing constant boiler attendance), required a lot of maintenance and were the source of industrial accidents. An alternative had to be found!

Chemists, on the job, made a technological breakthrough: Sulfur dioxide is compressed readily and has a good latent heat* of 25 kJ/mol

Chemists and physicists were able to put a kitchen sized version of the refrigerator on the market after World War One.


Unfortunately, sulfur dioxide isn’t the most pleasant refrigerant: Early refrigerators leaked and if they didn’t, sulfur dioxide is corrosive, so they soon would. Additionally, sulfur dioxide is noted for its odor.

These early refrigerants were just not satisfying the public: they wanted something that would not stink up the house, burn it down, or kill them outright! It is with this criterion in mind that Frigidaire Division of GM set out to come up with a solution. They appointed Robert McNary, Thomas Midgley and Albert Henne to the task of finding performing, inert refrigerants for use in the household. It is this team that discovered dichlorodifluoromethane as a refrigerant in 1928 ."

By the late 1930's the North American refrigeration industry was moving rapidly to the adoption of fully "hermetic" systems, in which the motor and compressor where sealed in a single steel dome, which was connected to the evaporator in a seamless, integrated design not requiring the services of a skilled, field, refrigeration mechanic. The fully hermetic design for the household cabinet refrigerator was the next evolutionary step towards improving performance, reliability and life expectancy, all of which would increase dramatically. Kelvinator made significant contribution to the development of hermetic system design, Kelvinator of Canada, Circa 1955

Technical Significance
The change in performance, reliability and life expectancy which accompanied the wing to hermetic design could scarcely be over estimated. The period of regular motor oiling, drive belt replacement and leaking compressors and tubing connectors was gone. The operating life expectancy of such systems was all of a sudden 20 years or more.

Many contemporary appliances would not have this level of staying power, many would ware out or require major services within just five years or less and of course, there is that perennial bug bear of planned obsolescence where components our deliberately designed to fail or manufactured with limited edition specificities.

.......The bitterness of poor quality is remembered long after the sweetness of todays funny silly crap gadgets low price has faded from memory.....

Every OLD Refrigerator saved let revive knowledge, thoughts, Cool engineering, noises, moments of the past life which will never return again.........


Don't forget the past, the end of the world is upon us! Pretty soon it will all turn to dust!

Have big FUN ! !


©2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 Frank Sharp - You do not have permission to copy photos and words from this blog, and any content may be never used it for auctions or commercial purposes, however feel free to post anything you see here with a courtesy link back, btw a link to the original post here , is mandatory.
All sets and apparates appearing here are property of
Engineer Frank Sharp. NOTHING HERE IS FOR SALE !

Saturday, August 18, 2012

IGNIS (SIRI) MOD. 4210 SERIE IL MILIONE YEAR 1963.














The IGNIS (SIRI) MOD. 4210 SERIE IL MILIONE is a special edition refrigerator and is another everlasting.

Was called serie  "IL MILIONE" (The million series) because IGNIS (SIRI) manufacturer have surpassed at the time his million produced fridge, and designed this model with this special mark for that reason.

It was produced by SIRI (Società Italiana Refrigeranti Industriali) wich was the BORGHI industrial conglomerate dedicated to refrigerator fabrication in ITALY capable to export his products widely in Europe in the 60's.

The  IGNIS (SIRI) MOD. 4210 SERIE IL MILIONE  after power up  starts cooling in less than 8 seconds
and a nice hiss noise can be heard at freezer level. The compressor with it's 1150 rpm is almost runnin  in absolute quietly silence with a quite powerful pumping feature.

The IGNIS (SIRI) MOD. 4210 SERIE IL MILIONE  is ready to be used after 30mins after startup, even with an external temperature of 35°C !! !! !
and  it has the awesome feature of a pedal to open the door when both hands are occupied. (A foot door opener attachment for a refrigerator for easily and conveniently opening the door of a refrigerator with little effort. The foot door opener attachment for a refrigerator includes a mounting bracket being adapted to securely attach to a side wall of the refrigerator near where the door to the refrigerator can be opened; and also includes a spring-loaded lever being pivotally mounted at a central portion thereof to the mounting bracket and having a second end, a first end, and a spring member being securely attached to the mounting bracket and to the first end to bias the first end of the spring-loaded lever out of contact with the door of the refrigerator; and further includes a foot support member being securely mounted to the second end of the spring-loaded lever; and also includes a door opening member securely attached to the first end of the spring-loaded lever).

After 50 years it doesn't suffer the "weight" of it's age............................



The refrigerator is running with a STEMPEL HERMETIK HP 1/8 V220 V230 50/60HZ. compressor which was last officially produced STEMPEL HERMETIK before closing and deletion by Danfoss aquisition in 1964. These compressors weren't sharing anything technologically with  TECUMSEH or  others brands related patents therefore are pretty unique.

The compressor and the coil plant in this fridge is a rare example of powerful cooling.....quiet.....reliable evelasting running.

Many contemporary appliances would not have this level of staying power, many would ware out or require major services within just five years or less and of course, there is that perennial bug bear of planned obsolescence where components our deliberately designed to fail or manufactured with limited edition specificities..............................


IGNIS (SIRI) MOD. 4210 SERIE IL MILIONE  Carrier for a motor compressor of a refrigerating machine:STEMPEL HERMETIK HP 1/8 V220 V230 50/60HZ.




 
Application August 2, 1955, Serial No. 525,929
Claims priority, appiication Germany August 5, 1954


The present invention relates TO refrigerating machines.

More particularly, the present invention relates to the
motor compressor unit of a refrigerating machine and
especially to the carrier which is connected to the motor
and the compressor of such a refrigerating machine.

Such a carrier is conventionally made from a material
such as cast iron which must be machined considerably
after it is cast. Furthermore, such a carr
ier member
must be perfectly clean before it is incorporated into the
to refrigerating final assembly in order to guarantee proper operation,
and the machining of a cast member creates great prob-
lems in cleaning the member after it is machined because
chips, oil and the like, get into inaccessible places. In
addition, a motor compressor unit of a refrigerating
machine is required to be located in an extremely small
space, and the minimum size required by a carrier in
the form of a casting often creates difliculties with respect
to the small space afforded for the motor compressor
assembly. It is apparent, therefore, that in a conven-
tional motor compressor assembly the provision of a
conventional carrier which is a cast member machined
subsequent to its casting creates many difficulties and un-
desirably increases the cost of the structure.

It is an object of the present invention to overcome
the above drawbacks by providing
for a motor compressor
assembly of the above type a carrier which is not made
from a cast member and which need not be machined.
In this way, many of the above-mentioned problems re-
sulting from the machining and the cleaning of a cast
member are avoided.

It is a further object of the present invention to form
a carrier of the above type oL1t of sheet metal which
may be stamped to a desired configuration and which
may be formed with suitable openings and the like simul-
taneously With the stamping, so that the inconveniences
produced by the above-mentioned machining are com-
pletely avoided.

Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention
to provide in sheet metal“ members of the above type
bulged portions which are capable of providing the carrier
 with chambers for reducing noise and for conveying
the refrigerating fluid along a desired path between
the compressor on the one hand and a condenser and
evaporator on the other hand.

Still another object of the present invention is to pro-
vide a process for forming a carrier of the above type
which eliminates many of the steps required in a conven-
tional process for forming a carrier.

Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention
to provide a structure capable of accomplishing all of
the above objects and at the same time being composed
of simple, rugged elements which are more reliable in
operation, which are inexpensive and simple to manu-
facture, and which are very easily assembled together.

With the above objects in view, the present invention
mainly consists of a carrier for the motor compressor
of a hermetically sealed refrigerating machine, this carrier including at least two sheet metal members at least
partly overlapping and joined fluid-tightly to each other
and formed with openings and bulging portions serving
as connecting surfaces, noise-reducing chambers, and a
bearing carrier.

Also, with the above objects in view, the present in-
vention mainly consists of a process for forming a carrier
of the above type, this process comprising the steps
of stamping into at least one of a pair of sheet metal
plates a plurality of depressions and openings, and soldering these sheet metal plates together in an inert
atmosphere to provide a fluid-tight connection between the
plates.

The novel features which are considered as charac-
teristic for the invention are set forth in particular in
the appended claims. The invention itself, however,
both as to its construction -and its method of operation,
together with additional objects and advantage thereof,
will be best understood from the following description
of specific embodiments when read in connection with
the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a sectional, elevational View of a carrier
constructed in accordance with the present invention
and shown assembled together with a bearing sleeve and
a fragmentarily illustrated stator of an electric motor,
Fig. 1 being taken along line I-——~I of Fig. 3 in the direc-
tion of the arrows and the carrier of Fig. 1 being inverted
with respect to Fig. 3 and being shown assembled with
the bearing sleeve and stator which are omitted from

Fig. 3;

Fig. 2 is -a sectional, elevational view taken along the
line -II~—lI of Fig. 3 in the direction of the arrows with
the carrier of Fig. 3 shown in Fig. 2 in a position inverted
with respect to the position of Fig. 3, the carrier being
shown in Fig. 2 assembled with a spring and with a
member for connecting the carrier with the compressor;

Fig. 3 is a perspective View of one embodiment of a
carrier constructed in accordance with the present in-
vention, part of the structure of Fig. 3 being broken away
to illustrate the details of this structure;

Fig. 4 is a perspective View of another embodiment
of a carrier constructed in accordance with the present in-
vention, part of the structure of Fig. 41 also being broken
away to show more clearly the details of this structure;

Fig. 5 is a perspective View of one part of a carrier
of another embodiment of the present invention before
this part is formed into its final shape;

Fig. 6 is a perspective View of the part shown in Fig. 5
after it has been formed into its final shape;

Fig. 7 shows in a perspective, exploded View two ad-.
ditional parts which are assembled together with the
part shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 shows the elements of Figs. 6 and 7 in their as-
sembled condition in a sectional, elevational view, and
these parts are also shown joined to the stator of an
electric motor and carrying a bearing sleeve for the crank
shaft of the compressor;

Fig. 9 shows in a sectional, elevational View still an-
other embodiment of the present invention, Fig. 9 illus-
trating the manner in which the carrier of this figure is
joined to the stator of an electric motor as well as to
the compressor and to the bearing sleeve for the crank
shaft of the compressor;

Fig. 10 is a sectional Vi
ew of the motor compressor
unit, the section being taken along line 10-10 of Fig.
3 in the direction of the arrows and showing a carrier as
shown in Figs. 1-3;

Fig. 11 is an elevational, partly sectioned View similar
E) Fig. 10, the section being taken along line 11 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 12 is a partial end view of Fig. 10 viewed in the
direction of the arrow A in Fig. 10; and
Fig. 13 is a schematic, overall view of the refrigerator
unit, showing the pipe connections between the motor
compressor, condenser and evaporator.

Referring now to the Figs. 1-3, it will be seen that the
carrier illustrated in these figures includes an outer dished
member 1 and an inner dished member 2 nested within
the outer dished member 1 and joined together in a fluid-
tight manner preferably by soldering in an inert atmos-
phere so that the dished members 1 and 2 are unified
into a single unit.

In accordance with the present invention the dished
members 1 and 2 are formed with bulged portions which
define the noise-reducing chambers 3 and 4- when the
dished members 1 and 2 are assembled in the manner
illustrated in Figs. 1-3. Furthermore, the dished mem-
bers 1 and 2 have bulged portions which together define
antechambers 5 and 6 adapted to communicate with the
compressor and respectively communicating with the
chambers 3 and 4 through the conduit portions 7 and

3, respectively formed by elongated bulges in the outer ‘I

dished member 1. These dished members are formed
with additional bulged portions 9 which are adapted to
be connected to springs 10 in the manner shown in Fig.
2, these springs resiliently supporting the motor compressor assembly, best shown in Figs. 10 and 11, and it
will be noted that all of these bulged portions are sym-
metrically distributed in the floors of the dished mem-
bers 1 and 2. The dished member 1 is furthermore
formed with lateral, outwardly bulging portions 11 serv-
ing to fasten the dished members to the stator 12 of an
electric motor. Preferably, bored blocks M are located
within the spaces 13 formed between the bulged portions
11 of outer dished member 1 and the outer surface of
inner dished member 2, and these blocks 14 are soldered
to the dished members and serve to guide the connecting
members 15 w
hich serve to connect the carrier to the
motor. Furthermore, the bottom wall portions of the
dished members 1 and 2 are formed during stamping of
these dished members, for example, with substantially
frusto-conical extensions 16 and 17, respectively, which
are centrally located with respect to the dished members
and which extend away from each other in the manner
indicated in Figs. 1-3. These tubular extensions 16 and
17 serve as a support for a bearing sleeve 18 (Fig. 1)
which serves as a bearing for the crank shaft of the com-
pressor, this crank shaft being driven by the motor 12
as shown in Figs. 10 and 11. This bearing sleeve 18 is
welded firmly to the extensions 16 and 17 so that in ad-
dition to serving as a bearing, the sleeve 18 serves the
additional function of adding stiffness to the assembly
which forms the carrier of the present invention.
Where the carrier of the invention is to be used with
a hermetically sealed motor compressor assembly of high
output, such as for large refrigerators or refrigerated
show cases, then, of course, the noise-reducing chambers
3 and 4 as well as the antechambers 5 and 6 must be
fairly large. In order to be able to form chambers 3-6
of the required size in a practical manner, the bulged
portions of the dished members 1 and 2 which define
these chambers are mirror images of each other so that
each member 1 and 2 is required t
o provide only a frac-
tion of the volume of these chambers, and in this way
it is possible to provide the desired large volume of these
chambers without difficulty. On the other hand, the
smaller conduit portions 7 and 8 as well as the suction
conduit portion 19 leading to the chamber 3 are formed
only in the dished member 1 by stamping the elongated
bulged portions therein indicated in the drawings.

 Openings 20-23 are preferably formed by stamping
simultaneously with the stamping of the dished mem-
bers or if these dished members are drawn then the
openings 2tl——23 may be stamped immediately after the
drawing in a combined drawing and stamping machine.
The opening 23 serves as a connection for a looped pres-
sure conduit which extends from the opening 235 the casing wall of the refrigerating machine through the
sealed cooling medium to the condenser, while the re-
frigerating medium flowing back from the evaporator of
the refrigerating machine flows along the suction con-
duit 19 to the suction side of the compressor as diagram-
matically shown in Fig. 13. In other words, the suc-
tion inlet of the compressor communicates with the open-
ing 21 to draw fluid through conduit 19 into chambers
3 and from the latter through the conduit 8 into the
antechamber 5 from where the fluid flows into the com-
pressor to be forced by the compressor through the
opening 21 connected to the pressure outlet of the com-
pressor and then along the conduit 8 through the cham-
bers 4 to the opening 23 from where the medium flows
in the manner described above to the condenser.

In order to connect the compressor 4’ to the carrier
1, 2 in a fluid-tight manner, a steel plate 24 (Figs. 2,
10, 11 and 12) is soldered to the outer surfaces of the
antechambers 5 and 6 and the compressor is joined to
this steel plate 24 with a suitable sealing element located
therebetween. The plate 24 is provided with a pair of
elongated cutouts 25 separated by a wall portion of
the plate 24, and these cutouts 25 respectively commu-
nicate with the openings 21 and 22 and with the suction
and pressure sides of the compressor so that in this
way the compressor sucks fluid from chamber 5 and
forces fluid into chamber 6.




The em
bodiment of the invention which is illustrated
in Fig. 4- and which is suitable for motor compressor
units of lighter weight and smaller output as compared
to that associated with the embodiment of Figs. 1-3,
differs from that of Figs. 1-3 in that the carrier of Fig. 4
includes only one dished member 1a. The other sheet
metal member which cooperates with the dished sheet
metal member 1a to form the carrier of Fig. 4 is simply
in the form of a substantially disc-shaped plate 2a
soldered to the outer surface of the bottom wall of
the dished member 1a. With the embodiment of Fig. 4
only the sheet metal member 2a is formed with the
bulged portions which provide the chambers 3-6 and
the conduit means 7, 8 and 19 communicating with these
chambers. However, the bulged portions 9 which serve
as connections to the springs 10 and the bulged portions
11a which serve to connect the carrier to the motor are
formed in the dished member 1a. Furthermore, the
substantially frusto-conical tubular projections 16 and
17 are respectively formed in the members 2a and la
and serve in the same way as in the embodiment of
Figs. 1-3 to carry the bearing sleeve for the crank shaft
of the compressor. With the embodiment of Fig. 4 the
outer diameter of the single dished member 1a may be
made relatively large inasmuch as the bulged portions

Ila are formed by reentrant portions extending inwardly From the outer periphery of the dished member 1a, and with this embodiment, elements such as the blocks 14 shown in Fig. 1 are unnecessary and are omitted. Except for the above differences the embodiment of Fig. 4
is identical with that of Figs. 1-3 and cooperates in the same way with the motor and the compressor of the refrigerating machine.

Figs. 5-8 illustrate an embodiment of the invention
which may advantageously be used with stators which
do not have a cylindrical outer configuration, but which
are, instead, more rectangular and provided with rounded
corners, as they are sometimes formed in the newer re-
frigerating machines in order to save weight and space.
Thus, with this embodiment of the invention, the carrier
includes essentially a four-cornered box 32 open at its
top as shown in Fig. 6 and formed by turning upwardly
and joining to each other the flaps 30a formed in the
plate 34) of Fig. 5 by forming angular cutouts 31 in the
corners of this plate 36, and a substantially fiat plate
33 joined to the outer surface of the bottom wall of the
box 32 and extending at one Sid? beyond the box 32.


The joining of the members 32 and 33 is preferably
formed by spot or roll welding at suitable places. Fur-
thermore, the upwardly bent flaps 30a which abut at
their side edges are welded together at these abutting side
edges. As is apparent from the drawings, the floor
portion of the box 32 as well as the plate 35 are formed
with the substantially frusto-conical tubular aligned ex-
tensions 17 and 16, respectively, which extend away
from each other in the manner shown in the drawings
and which serve to carry the bearing sleeve 18, as in-
dicated in Fig. 8. Furthermore, both the plate St) and
the plate 35 are formed with openings 20, the openings
20 of plate 35 being aligned with the openings 20 of
box 32 when these elements are joined to each other, and
the connecting screws 15 of the stator extend through
these openings when the motor is fixed to the carrier of
Figs. 5-8.

The bulging portion
s which form the noise-reducing
as well as fluid guiding chambers 3--6 as well as the
conduits communicating with the same are formed in
a separate plate 34 with the embodiment of Figs. 5-8,
this plate 34 being joined directly to the underside of
the plate 35 as by being soldered thereto in a fluid-tight
manner. In the same way as was described above, the
outer surfaces of the antechambers 5 and 6 have a plate
24 fixed thereto in order to properly connect the com-
pressor with these antechambers. After the three parts
32-34 are joined together in the abovedescribed manner,
the portion of parts 33 and 34 which extend beyond
the box 32 in the manner shown at the right of Fig. 8
are bent upwardly to the dot-dash line position indicated
in Fig. 8 so that the conduits 8 formed by elongated
bulges in the plate 34 are curved, and it will be noted
that in this dot-dash line position, which represents the
final form of the structure, the portion 35 of plate 33
which extends beyond the box 32 as well as the portion
of plate 34 joined to portion 35 are located closely ad-
jacent to the box 32 so that the space required for the
assembly is reduced in this way.

A further embodiment of t
he present invention is illus-
trated in Fig. 9 which is of advantage in that the distance
through which the compressor extends downwardly from
the carrier and radially toward the casing wall is less
than would otherwise be the case, which is of consider-
able significance with respect to the eflective size and
material requirements of the casing, so that with this
embodiment great advantage is derived from the saving
of space required by the casing in the refrigerator. As
is Well known, only a minimum space is provided in a
modern refrigerator to accommodate the refrigerating
machine.

In contrast to the embodiment of Figs. 5-8, the em-
bodiment of Fig. 9 is provided with relatively large
frusto-conical tubular extensions 17a and 16a respectively
formed in the sheet metal plates 32 and 33 which are
joined to each other in a fluid-tight manner, as described
above. These plates 32 and 33 which are, for example,
soldered together, are fixed to the stator 12 in the man-
ner shown in Fig. 9. Because of the relatively large
aligned extensions 16a and 17a which extend away from
each other, these extensions together with the bearing
sleeve 13 carried by the same define a relatively large
chamber ea. Furthermore, the sheet metal member 33
is not spot welded to the dished sheet metal member 32.
instead, these members are soldered together in a fluid-
tight manner and furthermore, an opening 22a is stamped
in the member 33 and is located in a position diamet-

'rically opposed to the tubular extension 40 which is

soldered to the plate 33 in alignment with another open-
ing passing therethrough. Finally, the valve plate 24
of the compressor 41 fragmentarily illustrated in Fig. 9
is soldered in a fluid-tight manner to the plate 33 and
extends as much as possible toward the lower tubular
extension 16a.
In this manner, the distance through which the com-
pressor 41 extends downwardly and laterally from the
carrier 32, 33 of Fig. 9 is substantially shortened which
is principally made possible
by the fact that now the
chamber 4a may be used as part of the path for the fluid
under pressure as well as for noise-reducing purposes
and, therefore, this space between the tubular extension
and the bearing sleeve is no longer a dead space which
serves no purpose. The suction noise-reducing chamber
3:: is formed as a separate element with this embodiment
of the invention and communicates through a tube 42
connected to chamber 3a with a suitable bore formed in
the valve plate 24. The suction line communicates with
the chamber 3;; at the opening 43 thereof so that the
sealed gas may flow in the direction shown in the arrows
in Fig. 9 through the pressure noise-reducing chamber
dc: to the outlet opening 23;: of the tubular extension 4-2
to which the pressure line leading to the condenser is
joined.

It will be understood that each of the elements de-
scribed above, or two or more together, may also find a
useful application in other types of refrigerating machines
differing from the types described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described
as embodied in a carrier for refrigerating machines, it is
not intended to be limited to the details shown, since
various modifications and structural changes may be
made without departing in -any way from the spirit of the
present invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully
reveal the gist of the present invention that others can
by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various
applications without omitting features that, from the stand-
point of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteris-
tics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention
and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended
to be comprehended within the meaning and range of
equivalence of the following claims.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by
Letters Patent is:

1. A carrier for the motor compressor of a hermeti-
cally sealed refrigerator machine comprising, in com-
bination, two sheet metal members at least partly over-
lapping and joined fluid-tightly to each other, said sheet
metal members respectively being formed with aligned
tubular extensions extending away from each other; a
bearing sleeve extending into and fixed to said tubular
extensions and adapted to support a crank shaft for the
compressor; and closed chamber means formed in part
by at least one of said sheet metal members and adapted
to be connected to the compressor and the condenser of
the refrigerator machine for forming a noise-reducing
chamber.

2. A carrier for use in a refrigerating machine com-
prising, in combination, a first sheet metal member adapted
to be connected to the stator of a motor and a second
sheet metal member overlapping and joined in a fluid—tight
manner to said first sheet metal member, said second
sheet metal member having an outwardly bulged portion
forming with said first sheet metal member a noise-re-
ducing chamber through which a fluid is adapted to pass
and said first sheet metal member including a tubular
portion formed integrally therewith for supporting a
bearing for a crankshaft of a compressor.

3. A carrier, adapted to be connected
to the motor and
compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising, in
combination, inner and outer dished sheet metal mem-
bers nested together and joined to each other in a fluid-
tight manner, said outer member being formed with bulg-
ing portions bulging away from said inner member and
the latter being formed with depressions bulging away
from said bulging portions of said outer member and de-
fining with the latter a plurality of chambers, said outer
member being formed with grooves communicating with
said chambers and with openings for connecting said
chambers to a compressor and for connecting said sheet
metal members to the stator of a motor.

4. A carrier, adapted to be connected to the motor
and compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising, in
combination, inner and outer dished sheet metal members
nested together and joined to each other in la fluid-tight
manner, said outer member being formed with bulging
portions bulging away from said inner member and the
latter being formed with depressions bulging away from
said bulging portions of said outer member and defin-
ing with the latter a plurality of chambers, said outer
member being formed with grooves communicating with
said chambers and with openings for connecting said
chambers to a compressor and for connecting said sheet
metal members to the stator of a motor, said inner and
outer members being respectively formed with aligned
integral tubular portions extending away from each other
and serving to carry a bearing for a crankshaft".

5. A carrier, adapted to be connected to a motor and
compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising, in
combination, a first box-shaped sheet metal member ope
at one side and having opposite said open side a wall
portion formed with an integral tubular extension; :1
second sheet metal member fixed to and extending beyond
said wall portion of said first member and having an in-
tegral tubular extension aligned with and extending away
from said tubular extension of said box--shaped member;
and a third sheet metal member formed with a plurality
of depressions some of which communicate with each
other, said third member being joined in a fluid-tight
manner to said second member at the face thereof dis-
tant from said first member and said depressions form-
ing with said second member suction and pressure noise-
reducing chambers as well as chambers adapted to com-
municate respectively with the suction and pressure sides
of a compressor.

6. A carrier, adapted to be connected to a motor and
compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising, in
combination, a first box-shaped sheet metal member open
at one side and having opposite said open side a wall
portion formed with an integral tubular extension; a
second sheet metal member fixed to and extending beyond
said wall portion of said first member and having an in-
tegral tubular extension aligned with and extending away
from said tubular extension of said box—shaped member;
and a third sheet metal member formed with a plurality
of depressions some of which communicate with each
other, said third member being joined in Va fluid-tight
manner to said second member at the face thereof dis-
tant from said first member and said depressions form-
ing with said second member suction and pressure noise-
reducing chambers as well as chambers adapted to com-
municate respectively with the suction and pressure sides
of a compressor, the portion of said second and third
members which extend beyond said first member being
curved away from the remainder of said second and third
members and located adjacent said first member.

7. A carrier, adapted to be attached to the motor and
compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising a first
dished sheet metal member formed with a frusto-conical
tubular extension; 21 second sheet metal member joined
in a fluid-tight manner to said first member an
d formed
with a frusto-conical tubular extension aligned with and
extending away from said extension of said first member,
said second member being formed with a pair of openings
communicating with the interior of said conical extension
of said first member; a bearing sleeve fixed within said
tubular extensions of said first and second members and
defining with the latter a noise-reducing pressure chamber
adapted to communicate through one of said openings
with a compressor and through the other of said openings
with a condenser.

8. In a refrigerating machine, in combination, a pair of
sheet metal members superimposed on each other, said
sheet metal members having respectively opposite contacting portions fixedly connected to each other and op-
posite portions respectively spaced from each other, said
spaced portions forming respectively a pressure noise-
reducing chamber adapted to be connected to a condenser,
 pressure antechamber communicating with said pres-
sure noise—reducing chamber and adapted to be connected
to the pressure outlet of a compressor, a suction noise-
reducing chamber adapted to communicate with an evapo-
rator, a suction antechamber communicating with said
suction noise-reducing chamber and adapted to communi-
cate with the suction inlet of the compressor, all of said
chambers and the communications therewith being formed
only from said two sheet metal members.

9. In a refrigerating machine, in combination, a pair
of sheet metal members superimposed on each other, said
sleet metal members having respectively opposite con-
tacting portions fixedly connected to each other and op-
posite portions respectively spaced from each other, said
spaced portions forming respectively a pressure noise-
reducing chamber adapted to be connected to a condenser,
a pressure antechambcr communicating with said pressure
noise—reducing chamber and adapted to be connected to
the pressure outlet of a compressor, a suction noise-reduc-
ing chamber adapted to communicate with an evaporator,
a suction antccharnber communicating with said suction
noise-reducing chamber and adapted to communicate with
the suction inlet of the compressor, all of said chambers
and the communications therewith being formed only
from said two sheet metal members; and a tubular projec-
tion intcgral with one of said members for carrying a hear-
ing for the crankshaft of the compressor.

10. A carrier, adapted to be connected to the motor
and compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising,
in combination, inner and outer dished sheet metal mem-
bers nested together and joined to each other in a fluid-
tight manner, said outer member being formed with bulg-
ing portions bulging away from said inner member and
the latter being formed with depressions bulging away
from said bulging portions of said outer member and de-
fining with the latter a plurality of chambers, said outer
member being formed with grooves communicating with
said chambers and with openings for connecting said
chambers to a compressor and for connecting said sheet
metal members to the stator
of a motor, and said outer
member being formed with bulged portions for connecting
said members to the stator of a motor.

11. A carrier, adapted to be connected to the motor
and compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising,
 combination, inner and outer dished sheet metal mem-
‘ocrs nested together and joined to each other in a fluid-
trght manner, said outer member being formed with
bulging portions bulging away from said inner member
and the latter being formed with depressions bulging away
from said bulging portions of said outer member and de-
fining with the latter a plurality of chambers, said outer
member being formed with grooves communicating with
said chambers and with openings for connecting said
chambers to a compressor and for connecting said sheet
metal members to the state: of a motor, -and said outer
member being "formed with bulged portions for connecting
said members to the stator of a motor, said inner and outer
members being formed with opposed bulged portions for
connecting to said members springs for supporting the
carrier.

12. A carrier, adapted to be connected to the motor and
compressor of a refrigerating machine, comprising, in
combination, a dished sheet metal member formed in a
rim portion with reentrant portions for connecting the
said dished member to a stator of a motor, said dished
member also being formed in a wall portion thereof sur-
rounded by said rim portion with bulged portions adapted
to be connected to springs; and a second sheet metal mem-
ber fixed in a fluid-tight manner to the outer surface of
said wall portion of said dished member and formed with
a pluraIity of depressions some of which communicate References Cited in the file of this patent
with each other and whose interior spaces are directed
toward said outer surface of said wall portion of said
first member to define with the latter suction and pressure
chambers adapted to reduce noise and to provide communication between a compressor and an evaporator and
condenser respectively.






IGNIS (SIRI) MOD. 4210 SERIE IL MILIONE  Motor-compressor STEMPEL HERMETIK HP 1/8 V220 V230 50/60HZ.



The present invention relates to motor-compressors.

More particular
ly, the present invention relates to
motor-compressors of the type which are hermetically
sealed and “used in household refrigerators, for example.

With such motor-compressors it is known to provide
a carrier which is common to the motor as well as the
compressor in order to provide a very compact arrange-
ment. However, the motor-compressors known upto
the present time are expensive to manufacture particu-
larly because of the difficulties in providing the suction
and discharge valves for the cylinder of the compressor.
It is conventional to locate these valves in the end wall
of the cylinder, and this latter arrangement is exceed-
ingly complicated and expensive because of the necessity
for providing in the end wall of the cylinder a chamber
for accommodating both the suction and the- discharge
valves as wellas all of the structure associated ‘with the
suction and discharge valves. . V

One of the objectsiof the present invention is to over-
come the above drawbacks by providing an arrangement
which is far less expensive than the conventional;ar.-
rangement described above.

Another ‘object of the present invention is to provide
an‘ arrangement where only one valve need be accom-
modated at the end Wall of the cylinder of ‘the com-
pressor.

A further objectof the present i
nvention is to pro
vide a motor.-compressor partwhich serves to mount the
cylinder on the carrier of the motor-compressor with a
structure which enables this part to additionally serve
the function of housing a valve of the motor-compressor.

An additional‘ object of the; present invention is to
provide a structure capable of accomplishingall of the
above objects and at the same time being composed of
simple ‘and ruggedly constructed; elements which are in-
expensive to manufacture and assemble and which are
very reliable in operation.
With the above objects in view, the present invention
mainly consists of a motor-compressor which includes a
carrier for carrying both the motor and compressor. A
cylinder forms part of the compressor and is provided
of the cylinder for controlling the flow of fluid therefrom.
The novel features which are considered as character-
istic for the invention are set forth in particular in the
appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as
to its construction and its method of operation, together
with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be
best understood from the following description. of specific
embodiments when read in connection with the accom-
panying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary, sectional, perspective, partly
exploded view of a construction according to the present
invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the cylinder of the compressor
with the block which mounts the cylinder on the carrier
which is common to the compressor and the_motor;

Fig. 2a is a fragmentary elevational view illustrating
the manner in which the cylinder is fixed to the carrier;

Fig. 3 is a perspective exploded view .illustrating the
structure of the suction valve of the cylinder;

Fig. 3a is a fragmentary sectional view further illustrat-
ing the ‘structure of the suction valve of ‘the cylinder; ‘ _

Fig. 4 is a -sectional elevational view onan enlarged
scale illustrating the discharge valve structure according
to the present invention; and

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan view taken alongline 5--5
of Fig. 4 in the direction of the arrows.’ ‘

Referring now to the drawings and to Fig.‘ 1 in par-
ticular, it will be seen that a carrier 18 is provided for
carrying both the motor and the compressor. This car-
rier l8 isjmade of sheet metal and is ‘suitably shaped
as indicated in Fig._ 1 for carrying both the motor ‘and
the compressor. The stator" of the motor is directly
carried by the carrier 18, and at the upper left_ portion
of Fig. 1 is shown‘ the bearing of the motor which turn-
ably guides the motor shaft, this hearing being ‘directly
carried by the carrier 18, as indicated in Fig. _1. “The
motor shaft extends downwardly beyond the bearing
shown at the upper left portion of
Fig. 1 in a substan-
tially vertical direction and is connected through a suit-
able crank to a piston which reciprocates i.n the cylinder
1 shown in Fig. 1, this cylinder, 1 ‘forming part'.o_f the
compressor which is also carried, by the carrier 18.
The cylinder 1 is fixed to, the carrier 18 ‘through the
medium of a block 2 which will be further ‘described
below.

The cylinder 1 has an elongated end portion‘ 3 of a.
lesser thickness than the remainder of the cylinder ‘and
joined to the remainder of the cylinder by a shoulder 4.
An end ‘wall 5 together with a sealing disc _6 formfan
end wall means for the cylinder, and this end. wall‘._5,is
' surrounded by the end portion 3 of. the cylinder and.is
with an end portion of a lesser wall thickness than the
remainder of the cylinder and joined to the remainder
of the cylinder by a shoulder in the, interior of the cylin-
der. This end portion of the cylinder accommodates
an end wall which is fixed to the cylinder and formed
with a bore for admitting fluid into the interior of the
cylinder. Between this end wall and? the shoulder of
the cylinder there is clamped, a« sealing ‘disc which is
formed with an elongated cutout in which is located a
valve member for opening and closing the bore of the
end wall ‘of the cylinder. The cylinder is further formed
with a lateral bore which ‘communicates with a bore in
a ‘block which forms part of ‘a mounting means for
mounting the cylinder on the carrier. ‘This mounting
meansincludes a discharge‘ valve structure which com-
municates through a bore of the block with the interior
spaced from the shoulder 4, in the manner indicatedjin
Fig. 1.. The sealing disc 6 is, clamped between the shoul-
der 4 and the end wall 5,‘_and’this clamping is‘brought
about by the free end portion of the cylinder which
ex-
tends beyond the end walls and which is rolled over
in the manner indicated in Fig. 1 against the ‘end wall
5 to fix the latter to the cylinder as ‘well has to press
the sealing disc 6 against end wall 5 and the ‘shoulder
This sealing disc 6 may be made of any relatively soft
metal such as lead or tin, or it may be made of a_ -suitable plastic.
The end wall 5 is formed with a substantially“axial-
bore 7 through which fluid to be compressed‘ e‘nters.int_o
the‘ cylinder 1 during the suction strokes of thepiston
which lies therein. 1 At its face which is directedtoward
the interior of the cylinder 1, the end wall _5 is, formed
with an annular recess surrounding the bore 7 and pro-
viding at the inner face of the end wall 5 a valve ‘seat
portions.
The sealing disc 6 is formed, as is shown Almost"'clear
in’Fig. 3, with -an elongated‘ diametr-al cutout 10 which
is‘ of a substantially rectangular configuration and which
has narrow end portions 11, so as to provide the cutout
1_0: withclateral portions 12 which. are wider than the
portions 11. The end portions 11 of ‘the cutout Ill ex-
tend almost upto the periphery of the disc 6 and over-
lap,’ the. shoulder 4, in the manner shown most clearly
in Fig. 3a. .

The valve. member 9 is in the form of an elongated
metal strip, for example, and has a lesser thickness than
the sealing disc 6, as shown in _Fig._ 3a. This valve mem-
ber..9.'overlaps~with its free end portions the shoulder 4,
so that, as indicated in Fig. 3a, the valve member 9 is
freely movable between the shoulder 4 and the end wall
5; within the limits provided by the difference between
the thickness of the sealing disc 6 and the valve member
9. As is indicated in Fig. 1,. the annular channel of the
end. wall" 5 whichforms the valve seat 8 is wider than
the valve member 9, so that the latter is capable of en-
gaging. the valve seat 8 without interference in order
to close the bore 7.

THE opeRAtion. of the above described suction valve
structure for the cylinder 1 is believed to be evident.
‘Whenever. the piston in the cylinder 1 performs a suc-
tion stroke it willfautomatically draw the valve member
9.. away from the plate 5 to. open the bore 7, while .dur-
ing the pressure. strolzesof the piston the valve member
9 will be urged automatically into engagement with the
valve seat 8 in order to close the bore 7.

The block 2 which serves to connect the cylinder 1 of
the compressor to the carrier 18 is formed with a ‘bore
13,’and a lateral wall portion of cylinder .1 is formed with
a.bo1'.e which forms an extensionof the bore 13 and
which. is tangential to the shoulder 4 and the disc 6,
asisindicated in Fig. 1.. These latter bores form the
discharge bore. thro
ughwwhich-fluid‘ under pressure is
discharged.fROm..the.interior..of thecylinder .1 during the
compression strokes of the pistontherein.

A channel means.22a is fixed to.the carrier .18 in the
manner indicated in Fig. llto form therewith a pressure
chamber .22 which also serves as .a noise reducing cham-
hen. This. pressure chamber 22 communicates with a
discharge conduit 25. The channel means 22a includes
apart opposite ‘a wall portion .of the carrier.18 and
formed with oneof a pair of openings 21 communicat-
ing with. the interior of the pressure chamber 22.

c A wall. member 23a is fixed to the channel means 22a
at its exterior wall and is also formed with an opening
Zlcommunioating with the opening 21 of the channel
means 22a. Four side walls 23 are fixed to and extend
fromthe -wall 23a to form therewith a substantially box-
shaped structure which. serves as a discharge valve cham-
ber... A sealing ring 21: engages the free edges of the
walls» 23, and the block 2 engages the sealing ring 2a.
As..is, indicated in Figs. 2 and 2a the block 2 is formed
witha pair of openings 19 through which a bolt extends
into threaded engagement with a pair of the walls 23 in
order to fix the block 2 to the walls 23, and in this way
fix the cylinder 1 to the carrier 18, the ‘cylinder 1 being
‘directly fixed to the block 2. The. channel means 22a
may be soldered or welded to the carrier 18, and the wall
23a may be soldered or welded to the channel means 22a,
while the four walls 23 also may be soldered or welded
to the wall 23a. Thus, it will be seen that the block 2
together with the walls 23a.and 23 form a valve cham-
ber 20 in which a discharge valve means is accom-
modated.

The. face 14 of the block 2 which.is.‘directed toward
the. interior. of the enclosure 20 and away from the cyl-
inder .1 is polished and is.formed with an annular recess
surrounding the bore 13 and providing at the interior of
the enclosure 20 a valve seat 15. An elongated. valve
member 16 having awidthwhioh is less than the outer
diameter of the annular recess defining the valve seat 15
iswadapted to engage the -valve seat 15 for closing the
bore 13 and to move’ away from the valve seat 15 for
opening the bore. The structure of the discharge valve
means isshown most clearly in Figs. 4 and 5.

Thus, referring to Figs. 4 and 5 it will be seen that the
block 2 has a pair of pins 17:: fixed to and extending
therefrom into the interior of the enclosure 20. These
pins extend through a valve stop member 16a and into
a pair of coil springs 17 in order. to guide the latter.
Thus, the springs 17 urge the valve stop member 16::
toward the block 2, this valve stop member 16a being
formed with bores through which the pins 17a freely
extend. As is indicated in Fig. 4 the central portion of
the valve stop member 16a is curved away from the block
2 and has a concave face directed toward the same.

The valve member 16 is located between the stop
member 16a and the block~2, and thistvalve member 16
is formed at its ends portions with a pair of notches
through which the pins 17a freely extend, as clearly indi-
cated in ‘Fig. 5. Thus, the springs 17 act through the
member 16a to urge the" valve 16 to its closed position,
where the valve 16 engages the valve seat 15. However,
when fluid under pressure is urged through the bore 13
from the cylinder 1 during the pressure strokes of the
piston therein, the fluid under pressure is capable of mov-
ing thevalve member 16 away from the valve seat 15
into engagement with the central curved portion of the
valve stop member 16a, and at’ this-time the fluid under
pressure can flow freely into the enclosure 20 and through
the openings 21’ into the pressure chamber 22 and from
the latter through the discharge conduit 25. During. the
suction strokes of the piston in the ‘cylinder 1, the valve
member 16 automatically .moves back to ‘its.position-en-
gaging the valve seat 15 for closing the bore 13. Thus‘,
the structure whichserves to mount. -the cylinder '1 on
the carrier 18 also serves to accommodate the discharge
valve structure which cooperates withithe compressor.

A suction. chamber 24 which also serves as -anoise re-
ducing chamber is provided,- in’ the ‘manner’ shown’ in
Fig. 1, with a wall portion having ‘a tubular extension 7a
drawn therefrom, and this tubular extension 7a extends
with a press fit intothe bore —7 of the end wall 5, so that
in this exceedingly simple manner the suction chamber
24 is fixed directly to the end walL
Thus, it will be seen that with the above described
structure of the invention the end wall ‘assembly of- the
cylinder is exceedingly simple,’ and the structure for
mounting the cylinder on the carrier 18 also serves to
‘accommodate the discharge valve structure for the cylin-
der. Thus, the cost of the assembly‘ is greatly reduced.
The unillustrated parts of the motor compressor are con-
ventional and well known to those skilled in the art.
It will be understood thateach of the elements de-
scribed above, or two or more together, may ‘also find
a useful application in other types of motor-compressors
difiesring from the types described above. .

‘While the invention has.been illustrated and described
as embodied in motor-compressors for household‘ re-
frigerators and the-like, it is not intended to be limited to
the details shown, since various modifications and struc-
tural changes may be made without departing in any way
from the spirit of the present invention.

Without further ‘analysis, the foregoing will so fully
reveal the gist‘ of the present invention that others can by
applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various
applications without ‘omitting features that, from’ the
standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential char-
acteristics of the generic or‘ specific aspects of thisinven-
tion and, therefore, such adaptations should and are in-
tended to be comprehended within the meaning and range
of equivalence of the following claims.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by
Letters Patent is:

1. In a motor-compressor, incombination, a cylinder
forming  of the compressor-and having an openend
portion of lesserwall thickness than the remainder of
said cylinder joined to the remainder of "said, cylinder by
a shoulder in the i
nterior of said cylinder; an end wall
surrounded by said open end portion of lesser thickness
of said cylinder and closing said open end portion of said
cylinder, said end wall being spaced from said shoulder;
a sealing disc located between and engaging said end wall
and said shoulder, said sealing disc being formed with a
cutout and said end wall being formed with a bore com-
municating with said cutout; means for clamping said
sealing disc between said shoulder and said end wall and
for fixing said end wall to said cylinder; and a valve
member of lesser thickness than said sealing disc located
in said cutout thereof and adapted to move toward ‘and
away from said end wall for closing and opening said
bore thereof. -

2. In a motor-compressor, in combination, carrier
means for carrying a motor and a compressor; a cylinder
forming part of the compressor and having an end por-
tion of a lesser thickness than the remainder of the cylin-
der and joined to the remainder of the cylinder by a
shoulder located in the interior of said cylinder; mount-
ing means fixed to a side of said cylinder adjacent said
end portion thereof and mounting said cylinder on said
canrier means, said mounting means including a block
fixed directly to said cylinder and having a free face dis-
tant from said cylinder, said free face having a valve
seat portion and said 'b1ock being formed with a bore-
which communicates with the interior of said cylinder
and which is surrounded by said valve seat portion; first
valve means located in said mounting means and cooper-
ating with said valve seat portion of said block for con-
trolling the flow of fluid in said cylinder; end wall means
fixed to said cylinder and said end portion of lesser thick-
ness and engaging said shoulder of said cylinder, said
end wall means including an outer end wall spaced from
said shoulder and an inner sealing disc located between
said shoulder and end wall, clamped between said shoul-
der and end wall, and formed with an elongated cutout
extending substantially diametrically across said disc and
overlapping said shoulder, said end wall being formed
with -'a bore communicating with said cutout and sur-
rounded at the face of said end wall directed toward the
interior of said cylinder with a second valve seat portion;
and an elongated valve member of a lesser thickness than
said disc located in said elongated cutout thereof, having
'a pair of free end portions overlapping said shoulder of
said cylinder, and adapted to move into and out of en-
gagement with said second valve seat portion for closing
and opening said bore in said end wall.

3. In ‘a motor-compressor, in combination, carrier
means for carrying a motor and la compressor; a cylin-
der forming part of the compressor and having an end
portion of a lesser thickness than the remainder of the
cylinder and joined to the remainder of the cylinder by a
shoulder located in the interior of said cylinder; mount-
ing means fixed to a side of said cylinder adjacent said
end portion thereof and mounting said cylinder on said
carrier means, said mounting means including a block
fixed directly to said cylinder and having a free face
distant from said cylinder, said free fiace having a valve
seat portion and said block being formed with a bore
which communicates with the interior of said cylinder
and which is surrounded by said valve seat portion; first
valve means located in said mounting means and co-
operating with said valve seat portion of said block for
controlling the flow of fluid in said cylinder; end wall
means fixed to said cylinder and said end portion of les-
ser thickness and engaging said shoulder of said cylinder,
said end ‘wall means including an outer end tilall spaced
from said shoulder and an inner sealing disc located be-
tween said shoulder and end wall, clamped between said
shoulder and end wall, and formed with an elongated cut-
out extending substantially diametrically across said disc
and overlapping said shoulder, said end wall being formed
with a bore communicating with said cutout and sur-
rounded at the face of said end wall directed toward the
interior of -said cylinder with a second valve seat
portion; and an elongated valve member of a lesser
thickness than said disc located
in said elongated cutout
thereof, having a pair of free end portions overlapping
said shoulder of said cylinder, and adapted to move into
and out of engagement with said second valve seat portion
for closing and opening said bore in said end wall, said
cylinder being formed with «‘a «bore extending substan-
tially radially from the axis of said cylinder, and being
tangential to said sealing disc, and forming an extension
of said bore of said block. ,

4. In a motor-compressor, in combination, carrier
means for carrying a motor and a compressor; a cylinder
forming part of the compressor and having an end por-
tion of alesser thickness than the remainder of the cyl-
inder and joined to the remainder of the cylinder by a
shoulder located in the interior of said cylinder; mount-
ing means fixed to a side of said cylinder adjacent said
end portion thereof and mounting said cylinder on said
carrier means, said mounting means including, a block
fixed directly to said cylinder and having a free face dis-
tant from said cylinder, said free face having a valve
seat portion and said block being formed with a bore
which communicates with the interior of said cylinder
and which is surrounded by said valve seat portion; first
valve means located in said mounting means and co-
operating with said valve seat portion of said block for
controlling the flow of fluid in said cylinder; end wall
means fixed to said cylinder and said end portion of
lesser thickness and engaging said shoulder of said cyl-
inder, said end wall means including an outer end wall
spaced from said shoulder and an inner sealing disc lo-
cated between said shoulder and end wall, clamped be-
tween said shoulder and end wall, and formed with an
elongated cutout extending substantially diametrically
across said disc and overlapping said shou:lder,,said end
wall being formed with a bore communicating with said
cutout and surrounded at the face of said end wall di-
rected toward the inte
rior of said cylinder with a second
valve seat portion; an elongated valve member of a lesser
thickness than said disc located in said elongated cutout
thereof, having a pair of free end portions overlapping
said shoulder of said cylinder, and adapted to move into
and out of engagement with said second valve seat por-
tion for closing and opening said bore in said end wall;
and a suction chamber having a wall portion provided
with a tubular extension which extends with a press fit
into said bore of said end wall.

5. In a motor-compressor, in combination, a cylinder
forming part of the compressor and having an open end
portion of a lesser wall thickness than the remainder of
said cylinder joined to the remainder of said cylinder by
a shoulder in the interior of said cylinder; an end wall
surrounded by said open end portion of lesser thickness
of said cylinder and closing said open end portion of
said cylinder, said end wall being spaced fro.m said shoul-
der; a sealing disc located between and engaging said end
wall and said shoulder, said end portion of said cylinder
having a free peripheral portion extending beyond said
end wall and rolled over against the same for clamping
said sealing disc between said shoulder and end wall for
fixing said sealing disc and end wall to said cylinder, said
sealing disc being formed
with an elongated cutout over-
lapping said shoulder and said end wall being formed
with a bore communicating with said cutout; and an
elongated valve member of a lesser thickness than said
sealing disc located in said cutout thereof, having free
end portions overlapping said shoulder, and adapted to
move toward and away from said end wall for closing
and opening said bore thereof.

6. In a motor-compressor, in combination, a cylinder
having an end portion of a lesser thickness than the
said cylinder‘by“ a shouldeR in” the’4iiit’ei'-ioi-'1‘of‘said CYLINder; a‘: sealing" disc surrounded by said’-end portioniof
said’- cylinder‘ and’ located" in said shoulder thereof, said
sealing disc being formed with an elongated diametral
cutout having opposed end portions which are narrower
than the remainder of said cutout respectively overlap-
ping said shoulder of said cylinder; an end wall fixed to
said1 end portion of said cylinder and forming an end
wall of said cylinder, said end [wall engaging ‘said sealing
disc and pressing the same against said shoulder and being
formed with a bore communicating with said cutout of
saidisealing disc; and an elongated valve member longer
than the diameter of the interior ofsaid cylinder at a
portion thereof beyond said end portion of lesser thick-
ness located invsaid cutout and overlapping said shoulder
of» said cylinder, said- valve member havingin said nar-
rower‘ end p’ortioni'of said sealing disc free ends, respec-
tively,‘ which are of a lesser width than said narrow end
portion of said sealing disc-and said valve member hav-
ing a lesser thickness than said-sealing discso as to be
freely movable‘ toward and away from said bore of said
end wall.

7. In-—a'rnotor-compressor, in combination, a cylinder
having an end portion of a’ lesser thickness than the
remain‘der'of said cylinder joined to the remainder of
said’ cylinder by a shoulder in the interior of said cylin-
der; a sealing disc surrounded by said end-portion of
said cylinder and located at said shoulder thereof, said
sealing disc being formed with an elongated diametral
cutout having opposed end portions which are narrower
than the -remainder of said cutout respectively overlap-
ping said shoulder‘ of said cylinder; an end wall fixed to
said‘ end‘ portion of said‘_cylin'der‘ and forming an‘ end
wall of said'-cylinder,‘ saidcnd Wall engaging said sealing
disc and pressing the same against said shoulder and
being forrnedwith a borecommunicating with said cutout
of’ said -sealing disc; and an-—» elongated valve member
longer than the diameter‘ of the interior of said cylinder
at a portion thereof- beyond said end portion of lesser
thickness’ located in said cutout and overlapping said
shoulder of said cylinder, said valve member having in
said narrower end portions of said sealing disc,
cutout
freeends, respectively, which are of a lesser width than
said narrow end portions of said sealing disc cutout and
said valve member havinga lesser thickness than said
sealing disc soas to be freely movable toward and away
from said bore of said end wall, -said cylinder being
formed with a substantially radial bore whichis tangential.
to‘ said sealing disc and shoulder, whereby said radial
bore may serve as an outlet for’ compressed fluid while
said’ bore of said end wall may serve‘ as a suction inlet
for! admitting fluid into the cylinder. _

- 8. Ina -motor-compressor, in combination, a carrier
for carrying a motor and
a compressor; a mounting mem-
ber fixed to said carrier and having four side wall por-
tions extending from said carrier and defining a cham-
ber; -a block fixed to said mounting member at said four
wall portions thereof and closing said chamber, said block
being formed with a bore communicating wtih the interior
of said chamber; valve‘ means in said chamber for closing
and opening said bore; and a cylinder fixed at a lateral
portion thereof ‘to said block‘ at the exterior of said cham-
ber and» formed in awall portion-thereof with a bore com-
municating with the inter-iorof said cylinder and form-
ing’ an extension of the bore ofasaid block.

9; In a motor-compressor, in combination, a carrier‘
for carrying" a motor and a compressor; wall means fixed
tovsaid carrier‘ and forming a? pressure chamber with" a
part of said carrier, said wlall means having a wall por-
tionlocated opposite said part of said carrier; a substan-
tially box-shaped member fixed to said wall portion of
said wall means at the exterior of said pressure cham-
ber," said box-sliapedvmemberi having four’ side wall por-
tionsvand an‘-endvwall,.said end wall being fixed. to said‘
w-all-portion of: said wall-means. and saiclwall portion of
said“ wall’. m"'eai1"s=’» and: said?’ end’, wall being”-‘formed’: WitHIN
openings I which ‘-comrnunicate with each :-other‘ so‘ -that’ the
interior‘ of. said‘ box’-‘shaped member. communicates--with
the interior -of said pressure chamber,‘ said -four‘ sideiwall
portions having’ freevedges distant from‘ said pressure
chamber; a blockfixed‘ to said freeedges -of said box-‘
shapedmember and closing the same, said’block”b‘eing
formed with a bore passing therethrough and‘havi'ng-at
its face in the interior of said box-shaped member a valve
seat portion surrounding said bore; valve means located
in said box-shaped member and cooperating withsaid
valve seat for a'_dmitting fluid’ into said box-shaped mem-
ber and from the latter i11to said pressure chamber when
fluid above a given pressure flowsalong said bore of said
block» into said box-shaped member; anda-cylinder fixed
at a lateral portion thereof to said block at the exteri'or
of said box’-shaped member ‘and formed'with7a bore which
communicateswith the interior of said cylinder and-forms
an extension of the bore ‘of saidblock, whereby when com-
pressed fluid in said cylinder is discharged through said
bore of said‘ cylinder into‘ said bore of said block, the
compressed fluid willflow into said, pressure chamber
through said box-shaped member.

10. In‘-afmotor-compressor, in ‘combination; va-cylinder
forming part of‘ the compressor-and having an ropen-end
portion of lesserwiall thickness than the remainder-of said
cylinder joined to the remainderof said cylinder by" a
shoulder inthe interior of said" cylinder; an end wall
surrounded by said openend portion oflesser thickness
of said cylinder and «closing said openend portionrof said
cylinder, said”-end wallbeing spaced from said shoulder;
asealing disc located. between and engagingisaid endwall
and said shoulder, said‘ sealing disc? being formed with
an elongated cutout ‘overlapping said’ shoulder. andsaid
end wall being formed witlta bore communicating with
said cutout; means-for =clamp‘ing’_‘:saidsealingdisc between‘
said shoulder and said‘ end wall and for fixing said end
wall to said cylinder; and -an elongated valve member‘ of
lesser thickness than said sealing‘ d-isc'locate'd in said cut-‘
out thereof, having free end portionsoverlapping. said
shoulder.-' and adapted to move toward and away‘ from
said end wall for closing and opening said bore thereof.

11. In a motor-compressor, in combination, a cylinder
forming part ofthe compressor and havingin the‘ region
of an open-end thereof an annular face substantially nor-’
mal to the axis -of saidcylinder; a sealing disc abutting
with one face thereof against said annular face of said
cylinder andibeingfor
med with -an elonga_ted’cutout'ove’rl
lapping said annularface; an end wall abutting against
the other face of said sealing disc and being formed.’ with
a bore communicating with said cutout; means for‘ fasten-
ing said end wall to" said cylinder and for clamping said
sealing disc between said-annular face’ and said end wall;
and an elongated valve member of Falesser thickness than
said. sealing disc located in said" cutoutthereof, having-
free end portions overlapping said annular" face. and
adapted to move toward and away from said end wall for
closing and opening said bore‘ thereof.

12. In :a motor-compressor, in combination, a carrier
for carrying the motor and compressor, said ‘carrier hav-
ing a wall portion; channelmeans fixedito said wall por-
tion of said carrier‘ and forming a pressure chamber there-‘
with, said channel means having :a part distant from said
carrier wall portion formed with a borercommunicating
with the interior of said pressure chamber; a wall fixedt-o
said channel means at the exterior’ of said pressure cham-
ber andat s-aidi part of -said‘ channel meansformed with
said opening, said Wall being formedwith an opening
communicating with said opening of said part of said
channel mieans; four side walls fixed to and extending
from said wall fixed to said channel means to define an
enclosure therewith; a block fixed to said side walls and
defining with the latter and with said wall a closed en-
closure communicating. with said pressure chamber.
through ~saidesopening; said block being~.forme‘d with a-bore
passing therethrough; valve means in said enclosure for
closing and opening said bore; a cylinder fixed at an ex-
terior side portion thereof to said block and formed with
a lateral bore forming an extension of said block bore,
said cylinder having an elongated end portion of a lesser
thickness than the remainder of said cylinder and joined
to the remainder of said cylinder by a shoulder located in
the interior of said cylinder; a sealing disc located in said
cylinder against said shoulder thereof and formed with
an elongated diametral cutout overlapping said shoulder;
an end wall fixed to said end portion of said cylinder and
pressing said sealing disc against said shoulder, said end
wall being formed with a bore communicating with the
interior of said cylinder through said cutout of said sealing disc, said end portion of said cylinder having a free
peripheral portion extending beyond said. end wall and
,being rolled over against the same to clamp said sealing
disc between said end wall and shoulder; and an elongated
valve member in said cutout of said sealing -disc, of -a
lesser thickness than said sealing disc, having free end por-
tions respectively overlapping said shoulder, and being
freely movable toward and away from said bore of said
end wall for closing and opening the same.




 IGNIS, GIOVANNI BORGHI HISTORY.

 Investing in the industrial development of artisan villages
in Varese, Italy, Giovanni Borghi builds a factory for 200
employees to manufacture not only ovens and cooktops, but
also an appliance previously unknown in Italy: the refrigerator.
Ignis workers produce appliances for third-party companies
like Fiat, Atlantic, Philco, Emerson and Philips. Borghi builds
the “Villages of Ignis,” with affordable one- and two-family
houses (Borghi Villages), as well as a pool and sports center
in Comerio, Italy, and a hostel vvith recreational facilities for
young workers in Cassinetta, Italy, all intended to promote a
comfortable, healthy lifestyle.

  The Milan industrialist Giovanni Borghi founded the IGNIS brand of household appliances.  His factories would turn out one appliance every eight seconds, and make billions selling them to Italy's exploding middle class.   Borghi was famous for his early support of cycling, and his yellow IGNIS jerseyed squadra won more than a few great races in the late fifties and early sixties.

Borghi was aggressive, flamboyant and flashy.  And he took care of his stars - famously buying Spanish sprinter Miguel Poblet a Lancia convertible after his Milan San Remo win.   On top of his 25 million lire per year salary.  

Giovanni Borghi, was an Italian industrialist pioneer in the field of domestic appliances, returned from a trip in the USA with a real
illumination: refrigerators insulated with Polyurethane foam were much more
efficient and capacious than those hand-filled with mineral wood.
His refrigerators Group, Ignis, developed internally this technology and the
related equipment, a suitable alternative to the imported foam dispensers, which
were difficult to get, fix and maintain, stimulating an industrial supply of
similar machines.  

 And in 1959 Borghi signed the man most of Italy thought would be the man to replace Fausto Coppi:  1956 Olympic, 1958 Giro d'Italia and World Champion  Ercole Baldini.  He lured Baldini away from Legnano with a contract so fat many said it only served to asurre that il treno di Forli.. would...well...get a little too fat himself!  He was never quite as hungry once he went to IGNIS.

Borghi kept control of IGNIS in the family.  In the paternalistic Italian industrial model - like Ferrari, Maserati or Campagnolo.   He later turned the reins over to his son, who in turn finally sold the company to Dutch conglomerate, Philips.

 
When Philips decided to get into the major household appliances
market, its procedure was to buy increasing quantities of these goods from the Italian firm, Ignis, then at the height of its prosperity.
Once it became the principal client of the manufacturer, it took over supplying the latter by purchasing 50 percent of its capital. It took over the firm completely in 1972, to the satisfaction of the founder of Ignis, Giovanni Borghi. 


BORGHI DIED IN 1975.
 
Borghi is still remembered in Italia.   RAI even aired TV miniseries about his life this past year, "Mister Ignis". 


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